CyanogenMod OS is dead, will morph into LineageOS: Here’s what we know

CyanogenMod OS is officially dead, and support for the OS will shut down from today itself.
CyanogenMod OS is officially dead
CyanogenMod OS is officially dead
CyanogenMod OS is officially dead and support for the OS will shut down from today itself, rather than December 31. If you try and open the blog announcing the death of CyanogenMod, you get a DNS server error. CyanogenMod’s Twitter account posted, “As of this morning we have lost DNS and Gerrit is now offline – with little doubt as a reaction to our blog post yesterday. Goodbye.” However, CyanogenMod OS is morphing into LineageOS, and it looks like CyanogenMod co-founder Steve Kondik will be behind this project.
According to an official announcement from Cyanogen Inc, which is the company, “all services and Cyanogen-supported nightly builds will be discontinued” but “the open source project and source code will remain available for anyone who wants to build CyanogenMod personally.” Do note that Cyanogen Inc. as a company is not shutting down.
For the Android developer and fan community, the end of CyanogenMod OS comes as bad news, but not entirely surprising given that the company has been struggling. It was earlier reported that the company was planning to shift focus from the OS towards apps. It also means the end of support for “paid developers contributing code to the open source project as well as nightly build servers,” according to a detailed post on XDA-Developers forum.
The post goes on to explain the “CyanogenMod team will not continue official development on the project,” but the OS will rebrand as “LineageOS.” The post says this project has been discussed for some time now and the idea is to go back to “a grassroots, community-driven effort at an Android distribution.”
Also read: CyanogenMod OS is dead, all services will shut down on December 31
It also says that the team “could find a build server and set everything up to mimic the old CyanogenMod infrastructure – the end result of which would mean that little would change for the end user.” Of course, there’s no confirmation on whether this will happen, but it looks like Kondik is not giving up on his dream of a community-driven vision of Android.
Check out CyanogenMod’s tweet
So what will LineageOS be looking for? Based on the XDA-Developer post, one of the challenges for the new OS will be funding, and this source of revenue problem was something that plagued CyanogenMod OS as well.
CyanogenMod started as a customised-ROM for Android, driven by the developer community which offered updates and the latest features to a smartphone, even when the OEM itself was not rolling out the update for a particular model.  CyanogenMod had some features even before Google rolled it out for Android officially. This included the privacy option where users could restrict permission access for apps; Google rolled it out later with Android 6.0 Marshmallow. CyanogenMod also made it popular for users to tinker with their phones and change the complete look of the device.

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